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Mature Adult

Hemophilia B Endorsed

Information for Mature Adults With Hemophilia B

B2B Book: Learn From Experience: A Guide for Mature Adults

As a mature adult, you can reflect on the experiences that have molded you into the person you are today. You have earned your stripes and have settled into a life you can call your own, a life in which you are regularly reminded that you are living with hemophilia B.

With age can come additional challenges—physical ailments such as high blood pressure, diabetes, and arthritis; psychosocial issues such as depression and stress; and financial planning and retirement concerns. However, there is support available to help you recognize ailments and situations and guide you during this stage of life.

PATIENT STORIES

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Read firsthand, real-life stories from members of the hemophilia B community.

Featured Book

Learn From Experience A Guide for Mature Adults
Read this book to learn how to recognize certain situations that may arise for mature adults and for guidance along the way.
  • “I try to foster healthy self-esteem by trying new things with the confidence of a survivor and the wisdom of a mature bleeder. Chronic illness is a blessing when its management is just part of life.”
    Paul B.
    Patient
  • “I think it is so important to make the chronic illness a nondefining part of life. My daughter has hemophilia B, but that certainly isn’t the most important thing I want people to know about her. We’ve worked hard to make sure we keep hemophilia B in a place of balance in our lives.”
    Becky V.
    Caregiver
  • “I strongly encourage other caregivers to get involved. This gives you the tools and strength to better advocate for your care. It also provides that all-important support system.”
    Nina D.
    Caregiver
  • “I go to my hematologist with the direct intent of discussing my treatment plan and product; not empty minded, waiting for instruction.”
    Felix G.
    Patient
  • “Walking is particularly difficult, so I limp in private and swagger in public.”
    Paul B.
    Patient